Naloxone Distribution and Training

Naloxone (also known by the brand name Narcan®) is a medication called an “opioid antagonist” and used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Specifically, Naloxone is used in opioid overdoses to counter-act life-threatening depression of the central nervous system and respiratory system, allowing an overdose victim to breathe normally. Although traditionally administered by emergency response personnel, Naloxone can be administered by trained lay people, which makes it ideal for overdose prevention. Communities that participate in Naloxone education and use it see a 50% reduction in overdose cases.

KY HRC HAS:

  • Delivered Naloxone training to more than 200 governmental agencies, non-profits, schools, and businesses.
  • Distributed more than 15,000 Naloxone kits.
  • Trained 6,745 individuals in the community.
  • Provided Naloxone and harm reduction services to 77 of Kentucky’s 120 counties.
  • Distributed Naloxone to 52 zip codes in Jefferson County.

Naxolone Mail Based Distribution and Virtual Training

Naloxone (also known by the brand name Narcan®) is a medication called an “opioid antagonist” and used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Specifically, Naloxone is used in opioid overdoses to counter- act life-threatening depression of the central nervous system and respiratory system, allowing an overdose victim to breathe normally.

KY HRC has partnered with NEXT Distro to offer Naloxone Overdose Reversal training online and mail-based Naloxone distribution to reduce opioid overdose death, prevent injection-related disease transmission, and improve the lives of people who use drugs to those outside of the Louisville Metro area.

Click below to learn more about completing the online training and requesting Naloxone by mail.

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Syringe Services Programs

Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) help stop the spread of infectious diseases such as HCV and HIV in a community.

Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) are strategic components to comprehensive community treatment, prevention, and intervention programs that stop the spread of infectious diseases such as HCV and HIV.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has completed over thirty years of studying to determine the broad community benefits of supporting SSPs.

With substance use and overdoses impacting every neighborhood in our community, KyHRC has partnered with Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department, Homeless Coalition, and various other community stakeholders to bring awareness to the community about the benefits of SSPs.

Hep C and HIV Testing

A majority of HCV infections are due to injection drug use.  HIV that is left undetected and untreated can lead to AIDS.

Hepatitis C (HCV) is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to severe liver damage and is spread through contaminated blood. Kentucky has the highest incidence of Hepatitis C with 7-times the national average of infected people. The majority of new HCV infections are due to injection drug use.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system. If HIV is left untreated, it can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Approximately 1.2 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV today. About 14 percent of them (1 in 7) are unaware of it and need testing.

Mobile Outreach

MOUD services including psychiatric care, case management, access to treatment for substance use disorder (SUD), family support services, and education. The mobile outreach supports the community by providing harm reduction services such as increased access to naloxone, harm reduction supplies, education and training, syringe service programs, and access to onsite Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) telehealth.  The MOUD services including psychiatric care, case management, access to treatment for substance use disorder (SUD), family support services, and education.  The Kentucky Harm Reduction Coalition works in conjunction with the Louisville Recovery Community Connection, Seven Counties Services, and the University of Louisville School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry.

Worried about someone you love overdosing?

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